January 11 1908 – The Grand Canyon National Monument Is Created In Northern Arizona

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January 11 1908 – The Grand Canyon National Monument Is Created In Northern ArizonaRate this post With the famous declaration, “The ages had been at work on it, and man can only mar it,” US President Theodore Roosevelt designated the Grand Canyon in northwestern Arizona a national monument on January 11, 1908. By declaring it thus, the president allowed for public preservation work to be undertaken and the Grand Canyon is now one of the most visited sites in the US. President Roosevelt was awestruck by the natural beauty of the region during his visit in 1903 and was of the strong opinion that it was the nation’s responsibility to […]

January 13 1842 – Dr. William Brydon, Survivor of the Massacre of Elphinstone’s Army, Reaches Jalalabad

January 13 1842 – Dr. William Brydon, Survivor of the Massacre of Elphinstone’s Army, Reaches JalalabadRate this post In the midst of the First Anglo-Afghan War, residents of Kabul — the modern capital of Afghanistan — rose up against the British colonial government late in 1841. When General William Elphinstone failed to bring the military advantages of his professional army to bear on the rebels under Akbar Khan, a single man was able to escape to rejoin his compatriots at Jalalabad on January 13, 1842. The arrival of Dr. William Brydon, wounded and delirious, cemented the magnitude of the embarrassing defeat. The conflict began in 1838, when the Russians increasingly […]

January 13 1898 – J’accuse By Emile Zola Exposes The Anti-Semitism Behind The Dreyfus Affair in France

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January 13 1898 – J’accuse By Emile Zola Exposes The Anti-Semitism Behind The Dreyfus Affair in FranceRate this post On January 13, 1898, the famous French novelist Emile Zola published an article titled J’Accuse (I Accuse) in the newspaper L’Aurore (The Dawn) exposing the anti-Semitism in the Dreyfus Affair. J’Accuse was an open letter to the French president Félix Faure and uncovered the injustice and the perjuries involved in the court-martial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus – a French military officer accused of treason. The Dreyfus Affair was a sensational case that rocked the nation exhibiting the deep-rooted prejudices against Jews and Judaism in Europe long before the Nazi Party came […]

January 14 1967 – The Human Be-In, a Prelude to the Summer of Love, Occurs in San Francisco

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January 14 1967 – The Human Be-In, a Prelude to the Summer of Love, Occurs in San FranciscoRate this post The 1960s were an era of tremendous change throughout the United States. Through the work of Martin Luther King, Jr. and many others, the Civil Rights Movement gained more and more attention after originating in the south during the 1950s, causing people groups of all kinds to raise their voices — particularly around San Francisco, where the Human Be-In occurred on January 14, 1967. Just one part of the larger counterculture attitude among younger adults, the event would end up leading to the famed Summer of Love in the City […]

January 15 1970 – The Nigerian Civil War Comes to an End

January 15 1970 – The Nigerian Civil War Comes to an EndRate this post A decade after gaining independence from Britain, the West African nation of Nigeria experienced a reprieve from strife when the Nigerian-Biafran War — a civil war divided along ethnic lines — came to a close on January 15, 1970. Brutal at every turn, as many as three million people may have died during four years of combat. Following World War II, the British Empire receded slower in Africa than in Asia. Whereas many new nations on the subcontinent and in the Far East — India, Pakistan, Burma and so on — received independence within the first […]

January 16 1547 – Ivan the Terrible Takes the Crown of Russia

January 16 1547 – Ivan the Terrible Takes the Crown of RussiaRate this post Stepping up to the altar of the Cathedral of the Dormition, the 16-year-old Ivan Vasilyevic, Grand Prince of Moscow, assumed the throne on January 16, 1547. Known to history as Ivan the Terrible, he was the first to receive the title “Tsar of All the Russias” and would go on to turn Russia into a vast empire through nearly 40 years at the helm. Named Ivan IV at birth, he and his younger brother Yuri were orphaned at a young age — father Vasili III died of an infection in 1536 and mother Elena followed him […]

January 17 1811 – Battle of Calderón Bridge – Mexican War of Independence

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January 17 1811 – Battle of Calderón Bridge – Mexican War of Independence4 (80.87%) 23 votes The Battle of Calderón Bridge fought on January 17, 1811, was an important battle in the Mexican War of Independence. Over 100,000 Mexican revolutionists led by Ignacio Allende, Juan Aldama, Miguel Hidalgo, and Mariano Abasolo attacked the 6,000 Royalist troops on the banks of the Calderón River near Zapotlanejo, Jalisco. The soldiers fighting for the Spanish crown were led by General Félix María Calleja del Rey. The General was a renowned officer of the Spanish army and went on to become the viceroy of New Spain. Despite overwhelming odds, the troops led by General […]

January 18 1788 – The First Fleet Arrives in Botany Bay, Australia

January 18 1788 – The First Fleet Arrives in Botany Bay, Australia4.7 (93.33%) 3 votes A small English ship more than 10,000 miles from home slipped into Botany Bay on January 18, 1788 intent on bringing the most detestable of British society to the country Captain James Cook discovered nearly two decades before. The HMS Supply, scouting the shores in the horseshoe-shaped bay, was the advance party for an 11-ship convoy looking to establish the prison colony of Australia. By the middle of the 18th century, Britain was experiencing a population boom. Fueled by the discovery of modern practices of crop rotation and a vast increase in the production capacity […]

January 19 1915 – The Germans Bomb Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the First Civilian Targets in History

January 19 1915 – The Germans Bomb Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the First Civilian Targets in HistoryRate this post Motoring quietly across the North Sea, a pair of Zeppelins run by the German Imperial Navy changed warfare on January 19, 1915: flying over southeastern England, the airships dropped bombs on the towns of Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the first civilian targets in history. Of all the advancements on display during World War I, none would have a greater impact on non-combatants. About a hundred miles west of the coast of the Netherlands, Great Yarmouth sits on a wide expanse of beach in Norfolk. One of the easternmost cities […]

January 20 1936 – King Edward VIII Begins His Short-Lived Reign Of England

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January 20 1936 – King Edward VIII Begins His Short-Lived Reign Of England5 (100%) 1 vote On January 20, 1936, Edward VIII became king of the United Kingdom. He ascended the throne following the death of his father, George V. Edward’s reign lasted for less than a year, making it one of the shortest in the history of British monarchs. Edward’s scant regard for established traditions, royal codes, and protocol made him unpopular with the Church, the ministers, and member of royalty in the United Kingdom. He abdicated the throne by end-1936 in order to marry the American socialite, Wallis Simpson. Thereafter, he spent most of his life in France […]