WHAT HAPPENED ON - 19 January

January 19 1883 – First Time Use Of Electric Lighting System

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January 19 1883 – First Time Use Of Electric Lighting System
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On January 19, 1883, the overhead electric lighting system designed by Thomas Edison for Roselle, New Jersey, was used for the first time, making it to be the first city in the world to be lit up by electricity.

Thomas Alva Edison was born on February 11, 1847, in Milan Ohio. Despite his humble beginnings, a love of science and technology led Edison to become one of the most accomplished inventors of the world. By the time he died in 1931 in West Orange, New Jersey, Edison had given the world a number of inventions that would change the lives of generations to come – the electric light bulb, telegraph, alkaline storage batteries, phonograph, and kinetograph (a motion picture camera). Not only did Edison invent these, he also presented plans for the practical and mass application of his scientific inquiries thereby leaving an indelible mark in the history of mankind. He held 1,093 US patents in his name and many more in Europe.

Starting off as a telegraph operator at the age of 15, Edison’s appetite for innovation and inventions led him to set up the earliest industrial research and mass-scale production laboratory at Menlo Park. The phonograph and the quadruplex telegraph brought Edison success, money, and fame. …(Read more)

January 19 1915 – The Germans Bomb Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the First Civilian Targets in History

January 19 1915 – The Germans Bomb Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the First Civilian Targets in History
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Motoring quietly across the North Sea, a pair of Zeppelins run by the German Imperial Navy changed warfare on January 19, 1915: flying over southeastern England, the airships dropped bombs on the towns of Great Yarmouth and King’s Lynn, the first civilian targets in history. Of all the advancements on display during World War I, none would have a greater impact on non-combatants.

About a hundred miles west of the coast of the Netherlands, Great Yarmouth sits on a wide expanse of beach in Norfolk. One of the easternmost cities in England, it was a little more than an hour Zeppelin flight over water from enemy territory, a relatively easy target to reach. In the early months of the war, German authorities had not yet conceived of the idea of turning the airships into anything other than lookouts — most flights were slow cruises along the coastline in search of enemy ships.

For centuries, warfare tactics were constructed around the idea of “gentlemanly rules.” Opposing armies would line up on the field and fire at each other, attempting to divide the enemy force or sweep into an advantageous position behind. Inflicting civilian casualties directly during combat was out of the question. (After the battle was over would be an entirely different story.) Taking the fight to those unable to defend themselves would, theoretically, seriously damage the credibility of the German Imperial Army and Navy. …(Read more)

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